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Changes in immigration status and purpose of stay: an overview of EU Member States’ approaches: EMN Inform

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This EMN Inform summarises the findings from the EMN Study on The Changes in immigration status and purpose of stay: an overview of EU Member States’ approaches and is based on contributions from EMN National Contact Points in 24 Member States[1].

Key points to note:

  • All Member States have at least some legal possibilities to allow for changes to migration statuses. Some Member States have legal possibilities for almost all existing migration statuses while others are more restrictive. The main drivers of Member States to allow for such changes are primarily economic in nature.
  • The admission criteria and conditions when applying for a change of status do not differ much from those for first time applicants in the majority of Member States.
  • Changes from education reasons into another status are those most often legally allowed in the Member States and they are also the changes which are most often made in the EU (6% of persons with this residence permit changed status in 2014).
  • Changes from remunerated activities are the second most frequent changes made in the EU (4% of persons with a residence permit for remunerated activities changed status in 2014).
  • Changes from family reasons are least frequent (annually around 1% of persons with this residence permit changed their status in 2010-2014).

See also:


[1] Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Poland, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and United Kingdom

This EMN Inform summarises the findings from the EMN Study on “The Changes in immigration status and purpose of stay: an overview of EU Member States’ approaches”  and is based on contributions from EMN National Contact Points in 24 Member States[1].

Key points to note:

·         All Member States have at least some legal possibilities to allow for changes to migration statuses. Some Member States have legal possibilities for almost all existing migration statuses while others are more restrictive. The main drivers of Member States to allow for such changes are primarily economic in nature.

·         The admission criteria and conditions when applying for a change of status do not differ much from those for first time applicants in the majority of Member States.

·         Changes from education reasons into another status are those most often legally allowed in the Member States and they are also the changes which are most often made in the EU (6% of persons with this residence permit changed status in 2014).

·         Changes from remunerated activities are the second most frequent changes made in the EU (4% of persons with a residence permit for remunerated activities changed status in 2014).

·         Changes from family reasons are least frequent (annually around 1% of persons with this residence permit changed their status in 2010-2014).



[1] Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Poland, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and United Kingdom

This EMN Inform summarises the findings from the EMN Study on “The Changes in immigration status and purpose of stay: an overview of EU Member States’ approaches”  and is based on contributions from EMN National Contact Points in 24 Member States[1].

Key points to note:

  • All Member States have at least some legal possibilities to allow for changes to migration statuses. Some Member States have legal possibilities for almost all existing migration statuses while others are more restrictive. The main drivers of Member States to allow for such changes are primarily economic in nature.
  • The admission criteria and conditions when applying for a change of status do not differ much from those for first time applicants in the majority of Member States.
  • Changes from education reasons into another status are those most often legally allowed in the Member States and they are also the changes which are most often made in the EU (6% of persons with this residence permit changed status in 2014).
  • Changes from remunerated activities are the second most frequent changes made in the EU (4% of persons with a residence permit for remunerated activities changed status in 2014).
  • Changes from family reasons are least frequent (annually around 1% of persons with this residence permit changed their status in 2010-2014).


[1] Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Poland, Slovak Republic, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden and United Kingdom

Author: European Migration Network
Publisher: Directorate General Migration and Home Affairs, European Commission
Date of Publication: 03 August 2016
Geographical focus: Europe

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